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APH & Personal History in the News

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Article/Broadcast Title   Publication/Station
05/29/2013 Personal History Tips on Archiving Family History, Part I  (Byline: n/a)
IN BRIEF: Readers sent dozens of questions about archiving and preserving family history and stories to Bertram Lyons, an archivist at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress in Washington.
  The NY Times
 
    SUMMARY:     
 
04/24/2013 Personal History The Listening Project: Midwood takes Brooklyn seniors down memory lane for SPARC  (Byline: unknown)
IN BRIEF: A documentary filmmaker recorded the oral history of more than 40 senior citizens in Midwood, Brooklyn, NY
  TV News 12/Brooklyn
 
    SUMMARY: A series of informal oral history interviews with members of the Council Center for Senior Citizens in Midwood, Brooklyn. Each video on this web site represents a single slice of life from an individual.   Column/Show
online and community news
Distribution/Location Greater New York Cable Television
 
03/15/2013 Personal History The Stories That Bind us  (Byline: Bruce Feiler)
IN BRIEF: ... The single most important thing you can do for your family may be the simplest of all: develop a strong family narrative...
  The New York Times
 
    SUMMARY: Based on studies about myth and ritual in American families, by Dr. Marshall Duke, Emory University, recent analysis supports the concept that children become higher functioning when they have a strong sense of identity. There is a long-standing belief that families feel connected to a world larger than they are by sharing the family heritage.There was a lot of research at the time into the dissipation of the family,” he told me at his home in suburban Atlanta. “But we were more interested in what families could do to counteract those forces.” Around that time, Dr. Duke’s wife, Sara, a psychologist who works with children with learning disabilities, noticed something about her students.“The ones who know a lot about their families tend to do better when they face challenges,” she said.   Column/Show
Fashion & Style Section: This Life column
Distribution/Location US Edition
 
01/18/2013 Personal History Need Extra Cash? Start Your Own Business  (Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn)
IN BRIEF: Writing Family Histories is touted as a potential small business one can start for $5000 and under.
  www.aarp.org
 
    SUMMARY: Jane gives practical advice on "recareering" after you're 50, by discussing reasons why people go into a similar field from their prior profession and offers a blueprint for what atart-up steps one would would need to follow. Writing Family Biographies is included in this list in the online version of AARP Magazine.   Column/Show
Bulletin: Financially Speaking
Distribution/Location Online (international distribution)
 
12/07/2012 Personal History Before Passing Along Valuables, Passing Along Values  (Byline: Robert Powell)
IN BRIEF: Why legacies and life lessons are an increasingly important part of estate planning.
  The Wall Street Journal
 
    SUMMARY: Consulting firms to financial advisors, estate planners and law firms are realizing the importance of legacy documents and ethical wills as part of their portfolio in order to ensure that life lessons are passed on to loved ones. They see this as two-pronged approach: encouraging older adults to share their stories before it is too late, and teaching children and grandchildren to ask questions about their elders' past.   Column/Show
The Good LIfe
Distribution/Location Int'l distribution
 
12/01/2012 Personal History Your Company's History as a Leadership Tool  (Byline: n/a)
IN BRIEF: Regarding the importance of maintaining corporate histories, the authors posit that a sophisticated understanding of the past is one of the most powerful tools they have for shaping the future.
  Harvard Business Review
 
    SUMMARY:    Column/Show
The Magazine
Distribution/Location
 
05/14/2012 Personal History Alzeimer's Patients Turn To Stories INstead of Memories  (Byline: Joanne Silberner)
IN BRIEF: Using a program called Timeslips, Alzheimer's patients are shown pictures or lifestyle situations and asked to create a story about them. This has opened up lines of communication.
  NPR.org
 
    SUMMARY: Storytelling is one of the most ancient forms of communication — it's how we learn about the world. It turns out that for people with dementia, storytelling can be therapeutic. It gives people who don't communicate well a chance to communicate. And you don't need any training to run a session.   Column/Show
Morning Edition
Distribution/Location NAtional Public Radio and its website http://npr.o
 
04/02/2012 Personal History How The Pop-UP Radio Archive is Saving Culture  (Byline: unknown)
IN BRIEF: Three School of Information master’s students are working with a pair of independent radio producers, Nikki Silva and Davia Nelson,(NPR's Kitchen Sisters) to solve a longstanding information-management and archival problem.
  UC Berkeley School Of Information website
 
    SUMMARY: "The three are not just organizing old tapes; rather, they’re developing a flexible, customizable system that can be used by any of the hundreds of independent media producers who need to archive and access unsorted multimedia materials. The system, which they call the Pop-Up Radio Archive, will support long-term online archiving of multimedia materials; a sensible, accessible, standardized system of organization, labeling, and tagging; and optional online publishing to make the resources easy to find and available to the world.   Column/Show
News and Events
Distribution/Location www.ischool.berkeley.edu
 
11/06/2011 Personal History Storytelling inspires Iowa folklorist  (Byline: MIke Kilen)
IN BRIEF: Riki Saltzman's grandparents used to pull out family photographs. Today, she works for the Dept. of Cultural Affairs in Iowa as the state folklorist.
  Des Moines Register
 
    SUMMARY: "Riki Saltzman, 54, knows that in these lean times it might set off some anti-government rant about her position in the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs: "Our taxes are going to this?" (In fact, in earlier tough times the state folklorist position was eliminated). In Storm Lake, I met with a Tai Dam person who plays a three-string instrument and a Latino who organizes an Our Lady of Guadalupe celebration; in Correctionville, I met with rug weavers who cut up old clothes to make rugs, a rural family "make-do" geographical lifestyle; in Sioux City, I met with a rosemaler (Norwegian folk painting) and a man who came to Iowa not to work in a plant but to be a musician - a second-generation mariachi."   Column/Show
Life
Distribution/Location Iowa
 
07/13/2011 Personal History 'Memoir Project' Gives Tips For Telling Your Story  (Byline: unknown)
IN BRIEF: Everyone has a story to tell, but writer and memoir writing instructor Marion Roach Smith says making those stories interesting and readable is harder than it looks.
  NPR Radio/Website
 
    SUMMARY: "In her memoir writing guide, The Memoir Project, Roach Smith argues that too many aspiring memoirists focus on cramming every memory onto the page, instead of focusing on relating their story to broader themes. She tells NPR's Neal Conan that a useful memoir writing exercise is to consider what's worth including and what's best left out for the story you'd like to tell. She says that's what she did when she decided to write about her mother being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease when Roach Smith was 22-years-old. In the resulting memoir, Another Name For Madness, Roach Smith discussed her mother's alcoholism, but left out the details of her infidelity."    
 
07/13/2011 Personal History Author Interviews: 'Memoir Project' Gives Tips for Telling Your Story  (Byline: Neal Conan)
IN BRIEF: Memoir writing instructor Marion Roach Smith speaks with NPR's Neal Conan about her book, The Memoir Project.
  NPR
 
    SUMMARY: Everyone has a story to tell, but writer and memoir writing instructor Marion Roach Smith says making those stories interesting and readable is harder than it looks. In her memoir writing guide, The Memoir Project, Roach Smith argues that too many aspiring memoirists focus on cramming every memory onto the page, instead of focusing on relating their story to broader themes. She tells NPR's Neal Conan that a useful memoir writing exercise is to consider what's worth including and what's best left out for the story you'd like to tell.   Column/Show
Talk of The Nation
Distribution/Location US National Radio /npr.org website
 
07/01/2011 APH Personal storytellers capture the tales, memories of people  (Byline: Jennifer Miller)
IN BRIEF: Sherry Borzo, Pat McNees, and Larry Lehmer talk about what personal historians do.
  Des Moines Register
 
    SUMMARY: "...'There seems to be a trend toward looking at the value of stories of our life and our things, and of family connections,' (personal historian and APH member) Pat McNees says, pointing to the popularity of shows like PBS's "Antiques Roadshow," NBC's "Who Do You Think You Are" (which traces the family trees of celebrities) and National Public Radio's "StoryCorps" project, which records audio of ordinary people of every stripe telling personal stories."   Column/Show
Tell Me More
Distribution/Location Des Moines, IA
 
05/17/2008 APH Seniors record stories to preserve personal history  (Byline: Marilyn Gardner)
IN BRIEF: With notebooks, tape recorders, and video cameras, families are coaxing a lifetime of memories from beloved relatives.
  Christian Science Monitor
 
    SUMMARY: "Like most people, Hedrick Ellis grew up listening to his parents and grandparents tell family stories. As a teenager, he often tuned them out. But this year, eager to keep those memories alive, he hired a personal historian to interview his father and mother."   Column/Show
The Culture Section
Distribution/Location www.csmonitor.com
 
10/17/2007 APH The Power of Telling Family Stories  (Byline: MIke Brozda)
IN BRIEF: Seniors, families and caregivers recognize the value of reminiscences and life reflection.
  Agingcare.com
 
    SUMMARY: Dr. Robert Butler, founder of the NY-based International Longevity Center explores the beneficial effects of life review for seniors. An excerpt from the article reads: "Research shows that family history writing or reminiscing improves self-esteem, enhances feelings of control and mastery over life, and often results an a new or expanded vision of one's life." In addition, "...the chance to tell their stories improves cognition, lessens depression and dementia, and improves behavioral functioning."   Column/Show
Family & Relationships
Distribution/Location global/www.agingcare.com
 
05/01/2006 Personal History How To Write Your Life Story  (Byline: Megan M. Roe)
IN BRIEF: I was born. I lived. I died. These three statements will one day be true of everyone. But will they be all that is remembered about you?
  The Herald Journal
 
    SUMMARY:  Eliciting memories of events that happened years ago can be difficult, but may be aided by looking through memorabilia such as Scouting merit badges or childhood toys, William Dennis said. Sometimes, memories drawn from family members and friends bring humor and heart to a history.   Distribution/Location
Logan, Utah
 
04/01/2006 Personal History We Had The Love, But I Long for the Letters  (Byline: unknown)
IN BRIEF: What bothers me now is that I don't have anything tangible to look at. Yes, of course, I have pictures--photos, slides, even a couple of collections of slides on videocassettes.
  Newsweek
 
    SUMMARY: "What bothers me now is that I don't have anything tangible to look at. Yes, of course, I have pictures--photos, slides, even a couple of collections of slides on videocassettes. And, yes, it is heartwarming to see her and our family as it was and as it grew through all the stages of our lives. We were lucky enough to explore many fascinating parts of the world as a couple and with our two sons as they were growing up. The memories that pictures and souvenirs produce are marvelous, and I wouldn't part with them, but what I don't have, in black or blue on white, are her thoughts."   Column/Show
www.thedailybeast.com
Distribution/Location internationally distrbuted magazine; website
 
03/30/2006 Personal History Lessons of the Terri Schiavo Case  (Byline: unknown)
IN BRIEF: A one hour NPR radio interview on "Talk of the Nation" about the legacy of Terri Schiavo. (Note: APH Member Marc Aaron Johnson c
  NPR Radio
 
    SUMMARY: A one hour NPR radio interview on "Talk of the Nation" about the legacy of Terri Schiavo. (Note: APH Member Marc Aaron Johnson can be heard giving his views at 19:30 on the recording.)   Column/Show
Talk of the Nation
Distribution/Location
 
11/01/2005 Personal History Get to Know Your Family, Friends Better  (Byline: n/a)
IN BRIEF: Article on Real Simple magazine's website that give tips for making the most of your conversations with your parents about themselves and their past. Also includes a downloadable PDF worksheet of personal history questions.
  www.realsimple.com
 
    SUMMARY:    Column/Show
work-life
Distribution/Location website
 
10/06/2005 Personal History Farewell, With Love and Instructions  (Byline: Lizette Alvarez)
IN BRIEF: A story of how individuals can preserve the legacy of their life experiences.
  The New York Times
 
    SUMMARY: A story of how individuals can preserve the legacy of their life experiences. The lesson that is learned by this family that lost their loved one to breast cancer is one that we can all take to heart and use to inspire us to create a lasting legacy for our loved ones. May require free reg to the NY Times website to read article.   Column/Show
Thursday Styles
Distribution/Location
 
10/24/2004 Personal History Finding the Man War Left Behind  (Byline: Stuart Laidlaw)
IN BRIEF: A son searches army records to find the stories his father never told him.
  The Toronto Star
 
    SUMMARY: A son searches army records to find the stories his father never told him. "The papers also offered glimpses of my two grandfathers, men I never met. Both fought at the Somme in the World War I. My father's father was shot twice. It was my father's thick service record that I found most engrossing. The notations are sparse, and sometimes amusing, but poring over those 48 pages, I am able to piece together a picture of my father, the man who was my template for all men."   Distribution/Location
Toronto, Canada
 

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